Proceedings Initiatory to the First Presidential Inauguration 1789 Part II
 

[From the Washington Papers (Executive Proceedings, vol. 17), Department of State]
 
 

Volume: I Pages: 44-47

Resolve of the House of Representatives of the United States Respecting Mr. Osgood's Preparing His House For the Reception of the President of the United States.

                                                                                                     IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES OF THE UNITED STATES,
                                                                                                                              Wednesday, April 15, 1789.

Mr. Benson reported from the committee to whom it was referred to consider of and report to the House respecting the ceremonial of receiving the President, and to whom was also referred a letter from the chairman of a committee of the Senate to the Speaker, communicating an instruction from that House to a committee thereof to report if any and what arrangements are necessary for the reception of the Vice-President, that the committee had, according to order, considered of the same, and had agreed to a report thereupon, which he delivered in at the Clerk's table, and where the same was thrice read, and the question put thereupon agreed to by the House as followeth:

That Mr. Osgood, the proprietor of the house lately occupied by the President of Congress, be requested to put the same and the furniture therein in proper order for the residence and use of the President of the United States, and otherwise, at the expense of the United States, to provide for his temporary accommodation.

That it will be most eligible, in the first instance, that a committee of three members from the Senate and five members from the House of Representatives, to be appointed by the Houses respectively, attend to receive the President at such place as he shall embark from New Jersey for this city, and conduct him without form to the house lately occupied by the President of Congress, and tat at such time thereafter as the President shall signify it will be most convenient for him, he be formally received by both Houses.

Extract from the Journal.

                                                                                                                                             JOHN BECKLEY, Clerk.

Resolve of the House of Representatives Respecting A Committee To Meet the President Of the United States.

                                                                                                           IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES OF THE UNITED STATES,
                                                                                                                                 Wednesday, April 15, 1789.

Resolved, That it will be most eligible, in the first instance, that a committee of three members from the Senate and five members from the House of Representatives, to be appointed by the Houses respectively, attend to receive the President at such place as he shall embark from New Jersey for this city, and conduct him without form to the house lately occupied by the President of Congress, and that at such time thereafter as the President shall signify, he be formally received by both Houses.

                                                                                                                                                                  THURSDAY, April 16, 1789

The committee elected on the part of this House, Mr. Boudinot, Mr. Bland, Mr. Tucker, Mr. Benson, and Mr. Lawrance.

Extract from the Journal.

                                                                                                                                                                    JOHN BECKLEY, clerk

Request of the Committee Appointed By Congress To Know When They Should Meet The President.

The committee appointed in consequence of the resolutions of both Houses of Congress, and which accompany this note, most respectfully communicate their appointment to the President of the United States, with a request that he will please to have it signified to them when they shall attend, with a barge which has been prepared for that purpose, to receive him at Elizabeth Town, or at such other place as he shall choose to embark from New Jersey for this city.

NEW YORK, April 17, 1789.

JOHN LANGDON
CHARLES CARROLL, of Carrollton.
WM. SAMUEL JOHNSON.
ELIAS BOUDINOT
THEODORICK BLAND.
THOS. TUDR. TUCKER.
EGBT. BENSON.
JOHN LAWRANCE.

To The Committee of Congress Respecting the Time of the President Meeting Them At Elizabeth Town.

                                                                                                                                                PHILADELPHIA, April 20, 1789.

GENTLEMEN: Upon my arrival in this city I received your note, with the resolutions of the two Houses which accompanied it, and in answer thereto beg leave to inform you that, knowing how anxious both Houses must be to proceed to business, I shall continue my journey dispatch as possible. Tomorrow evening I purpose to be at Trenton, the night following at Brunswick, and hope to have the pleasure of meeting you at Elizabeth Town point on Thursday at 12 o'clock.

                                                                                                                                                 Go. WASHINGTON

Letter From The Honorable Elias Boudinot.

                                                                                                                                                             NEW YORK, April 21, 1789.

His Excellency GEORGE WASHINGTON, Esq.

SIR: The committee have just received Your Excellency's letter of the 20th, and will be at Elizabeth Town on Thursday morning.

I must beg Your Excellency will alight at my house, where the committee will attend, and where it will give me (in a particular manner) the utmost pleasure to receive you.

I have the honor to be, with the most profound respect, sir, your most obedient and very humble servant.

                                                                                                                                                     ELIAS BOUDINOT.

Letter From The Honorable Elias Boudinot, April 23, 1789.

                                                                                                                                          ELIZABETH TOWN, Wednesday Evening.

His Excellency GEORGE WASHINGTON, Esq.

SIR: I have the honor of informing Your Excellency that the committee of both Houses arrived here this afternoon, and will be ready to receive Your Excellency at my house as soon as you can arrive here tomorrow morning.

If you, sir, will honor us with your company at breakfast, it will give us great pleasure. We shall wait Your Excellency's arrival in hopes of that gratification. You can have a room to dress in, if you should think it necessary, as convenient as you can have it in town.

I have the honor to be Your Excellency's most obedient humble servant,

                                                                                                                                                       ELIAS BOUDINOT.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          
 

 

Website: The History Box.com
Article Name: Proceedings Initiatory to the First Presidential Inauguration 1789 Part II
Researcher/Transcriber Miriam Medina

Source:

BIBLIOGRAPHY: From my collection of books: A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents 1789-1897 by James D. Richardson, A Representative from the State of Tennessee published by the authority of Congress 1899.
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