Origin of Place Names in the State of New York Letter C

 

CALDWELL: town in Warren County, New York, named for Gen. James Caldwell, patentee.

CALEDONIA: village in Livingston County, New York, named from the ancient name of Scotland.

CALLICOON; town in Sullivan County, New York. The word is said to signify "turkey" in both Dutch and Indian languages. The Dutch word for "turkey," however, is spelled kalkoen.

CAMDEN; village in Oneida County, New York. Named for Chief Justice Pratt, Earl of Camden, a friend of the colonies during the Revolution.

CAMERON; town in Steuben County, New York, named for Dugald Cameron, agent for the Pultney estate.

CAMILLUS; village in Onondaga County, New York  built within the state and board limits, and named by members of the Board for the Roman magistrate.

CAMPBELL; county in Steuben County, New York, named for the Campbell family, early settlers.

CANADAWA; creek in Chautauqua County, New York. An Indian word, meaning "running through the hemlocks."

CANAJOHARIE; town in Montgomery County, New York. This name was originally given to a deep hole of foaming water at the foot of one of the falls in Canajoharie Creek. An Indian word meaning "kettle that washes itself," or "kettle-shaped hole in a rock." Morgan says the meaning is "washing the basin."

CANASERAGA; village in Allegany County, New York. From an Indian word, kanasawaga," several strings of beads with a string lying across."

CANASTOTA; villages in Madison County, New York. An Indian word, kniste, or kanetota, "pine tree standing alone." The branches over the creek which passes through the town.

CANEADEA; town in Allegany County, New York. An Indian word meaning "where the heavens rest upon the earth."

CANISTEO: river and town in Steuben County, New York. An Indian word meaning "board on the water."

CANNONSVILLE: village in Delaware County, New York, named for Benjamin Cannon, early owner.

CANOGA: Village in Seneca County, New York, named from a large spring which affords permanent motive power for two mills. An Indian word meaning "oil floating on the water."

CAPE VINCENT; town in Jefferson County, New York, named for Vincent, son of Le Ray de Chaumont.

CARROLLTON; town in Cattaraugus County, New York, named for G. Carroll, an original proprietor.

CARYVILLE; town in Genesee County, New York, named for col. Alfred Cary, early settler.

CASSADAGA; lake, creek, and village in Chautauqua County, New York. An Indian word, meaning "under the rocks."

CASTILE; town in Wyoming county, New York, named from the ancient kingdom of Spain.

CASTLE; island in the Hudson River, New York, so called from a stockade built by the Dutch as a protection from the Indians.

CASTLETON; village in Rensselaer County, New York, named from an ancient Indian castle on the adjacent hills.

CATARAQUE; river in New York. An Indian word meaning "fort in the water," the early name of Lake Ontario.

CATHARINE; town in Schuyler County, New York, named for Catharine Montour, the wife of an Indian sachem.

CATO; town in Cayuga County, New York, named by the State land board in honor of the distinguished Roman.

CATSKILL; creek, mountains, and town in Greene County, New York. The mountains were called katsbergs by the Dutch, from the number of wild-cats found in them, and the creek, which flows from the mountains, was called Katerskill, "tomcats' creek."

CATTARAUGUS; county, village in same county, and creek in New York. An Indian word meaning "bad smelling shore."

CAUGWAGA; creek in Erie County, New York. A corruption of the Indian gagwaga, "creek of the Cat nation."

CAWANESQUE; branch of the Chemung River, in New York. An Indian word meaning "at the long island."

CAYADUTTA; creek in Fulton County, New York; stated by Beauchamp to mean "stone standing out of the water." The origin is thought by Baylies to be purely conjectural. The most noticeable feature to which the name could apply was a large rock in midstream below some beautiful falls.

CAYUGA; county, village in same county, and lake in New York. An Indian word, the derivation of which is in dispute. The generally accepted theory is that it means "long lake," having been originally applied to the lake, which is 38 miles long and from 1 to 3 1/2 miles wide. Morgan derives it from gweugweh, "the mucky land," while others say that it signifies "canoes pulled out of the water." One of Iroquois tribes was so called. Six small places in the country bear this name.

Website: The History Box.com
Article Name: Origin of Place Names in the State of New York Letter C
Researcher/Transcriber Miriam Medina

Source:

BIBLIOGRAPHY: From My Collection Of Books: The Origin of Certain Place Names in The United States (Second Edition) by Henry Gannett. Originally published: U.S. Geological Survey, Bulletin No.258. Second Edition: Washington D.C. 1905. Reprinted Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. Baltimore, 1973, Baltimore, 1977.
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