A History of Tenement House Legislation in New York 1852-1900 Part XI
 

By Lawrence Veiller
 
 

(1868) Brooklyn Chapter 632, Section 17. (Provisions of Section 7, Chapter 858, of the Laws of 1866, continued.)

(1871) Chapter 625, Section 23.

"All buildings to have scuttle frames and covers or bulkheads and doors, made of, or covered with some fireproof material ; and all scuttles shall have stationary iron ladders leading to the same; and all such scuttles or ladders shall be kept so as to In: ready for use at all times ; and all scuttles shall not be less in size than 2 feet by 3 feet ; and if a bulkhead is used or substituted in any building in place of a scuttle, it 'shall have stairs with a sufficient guard or hand-rail leading to the roof ; and in case the building shall be a tenement-house the door in the bulkhead, or any scuttle shall at no time be locked but may be fastened on the inside by
movable bolts or hooks."

(1874) Chapter 547, Section 7. Continued.

(1882) Chapter 410, Section 494. (Consol. Act.)

"All buildings in the city of New York, whether already erected or hereafter to be built, shall have scuttle frames and covers, or bulkheads and doors, made of or covered with some fireproof material, and all scuttles shall have stationary iron ladders leading to the same, and all such scuttles or ladders shall be connected so as to be ready for use at all times, and all scuttles shall not be less in size than two feet by three feet ; and if a bulkhead is used or substituted in any building in place of a scuttle, it shall have stairs with a sufficient guard or hand-rail leading to the roof; and in case the building shall be a tenement-house, the door in the bulkhead
or any scuttle, shall at no time be locked, but may be fastened on the inside by movable bolts or hooks."

(1885) Chapter 456, Section 23. Continued.

(1887) Chapter 566, Section 22. (Amends Chapter 494, Consol. Act.)

"All buildings in the city of New York now built, or hereafter to be built, shall have scuttles or bulkheads covered with some fireproof materials, with ladders or stairs leading thereto. The scuttles in all tenement-houses shall have stationary iron ladders leading to the same, and all scuttles and ladders shall be kept so as to be ready for use at all times, and no scuttle shall be less in size than two by three feet. If a bulkhead is used in place of a scuttle, it shall have stairs with sufficient guard or hand-rail leading to the roof ; and in case the building shall be a tenement-house the door in the bulkhead or any scuttle, shall at no time be locked but may be fastened on the inside by movable bolts or hooks."

(1887) Chapter 566, Section 26. (Amends Section 499, Consol Act.)

"At least one flight of stairs in each of said buildings (every dwelling-house exceeding five stories in height hereafter erected or altered to be occupied by two or more families on any floor above the first, and every dwelling-house over sixty feet in height, hereafter erected or altered to be occupied by two or more families on any floor above the first, and every dwelling-house over sixty feet in height hereafter erected or altered to be occupied by more than one family shall extend to the roof and be inclosed in a bulkhead of fireproof materials."

(1888) Brooklyn Chapter 583, Consol. Act, Section 16.

"Every building that is now or may be hereafter erected shall have a scuttle or place of egress in the roof thereof of proper size to be approved by the said commissioner, and shall have ladders or stairways leading to the same; and all said scuttles and stairways or ladders leading to the roof shall be kept in readiness for use at all times. And all scuttle frames or scuttle doors shall be made of or covered with copper, zinc, tin or iron."

(1892) Chapter 275, Section 30. (Amends Section 494, Consol Act.)

All buildings shall have scuttles or bulkheads covered with some fireproof materials with ladders or stairs leading thereto. No scuttle shall be less in size than two by three feet"

(1892) Chapter 275, Section 34. (Amends Section 498, Consol Act.)

"All buildings requiring fire escapes shall have stationary iron ladders leading to the scuttle opening in the roof thereof, and all scuttles and ladders shall be kept so as to be ready for use at all times. If a bulkhead is used in place of a scuttle, it shall have stairs with sufficient guard or hand-rail leading to the roof. In case the building shall be a tenement-house, the door in the bulkhead or any scuttle shall at no time be locked but may be fastened on the inside by movable bolts or hooks."

(1894) Chapter 481, Section 23. (Amends Consol. Act )

"All buildings shall have scuttles or bulkheads, covered with some fireproof material, with ladders or stairs leading thereto, and easily accessible to all tenants. No scuttle shall be less in size than two by three feet"

(1894) Brooklyn Chapter 481, Section 28. (Amends Consol. Act. )

"All buildings requiring fire escapes shall have stationary iron ladders leading to the scuttle opening in the roof thereof, and all scuttles and ladders shall be kept so as to be ready for use at all times and easily accessible to all tenants. If a bulkhead is used in place of a scuttle it shall have stairs; the door in the bulkhead or any scuttle shall, at no time, be locked, but may be fastened on the inside by movable bolts or hooks ; and, if a bulkhead, shall have stairs, with hand-rail leading to the roof."

(1895) Brooklyn Chapter 292, Section 22.

"All buildings shall have scuttles or bulkheads covered with some fireproof material, with ladders or stairs leading thereto and easily accessible to all tenants. No scuttle shall be less in size than two by three feet."

(1899) The Building Code (An ordinance adopted December 20, 1899).Section 92.

"All dwelling-houses more than four stories in height hereafter erected or altered shall have scuttles or bulkheads covered with some fire proof materials with ladders or stairs leading thereto, and easily accessible to all occupants. No scuttle shall be less in size than 2 by 3 feet."

(1899) The Building Code (An ordinance adopted December 20, 1899.) Section 103.

"All buildings requiring fire escapes shall have stationary iron ladders leading to the scuttle opening in the roof thereof, and all scuttles and ladders shall be kept so as to be ready for use at all times. If a bulkhead is used instead of a scuttle, it shall have stairs with sufficient guard or hand-rail leading to the roof. In case the building shall be a tenement-house, the door in the bulkhead or any scuttle shall at no time be locked, but may be fastened on the inside by movable bolts or hooks."


 

Website: The History Box.com
Article Name: A History of Tenement House Legislation in New York 1852-1900 Part XI
Researcher/Transcriber Miriam Medina

Source:

BIBLIOGRAPHY: The Tenement House Problem; Including the Report of the New York State Tenement House Commission of 1900. By Various Writers; The MacMillan Company-New York 1903
Time & Date Stamp: