Erection of the First Merchants' Exchange of N.Y. 1869

 

At a Common Council held June 10, 1752 :

Whereas, Several gentlemen in this city having voluntarily subscribed towards erecting an Exchange at the lower end of Broad street, near the Long Bridge, Mr. John Watts appeared before the Board with a plan thereof, and desired their approbation, to which plan they unanimously agreed, and for the encouragement of so laudable an undertaking, voted that Mr. Mayor issue his warrant to the Treasurer of this city to pay into the hands of the managers of said building the sum of one hundred pounds, to be applied for that purpose. And Mr. Watts being desirous that one of the members of this Board might be joined with the managers, chosen by the subscribers, ordered that Mr. John Livingston be appointed for that purpose.

At a Common Council held August 27, 1752:

Resolved, That this Corporation do, at their own expense, build, or cause to be built, a room of twelve feet high, over the Exchange now building at the lower end of Broad street, and that the sum of two hundred pounds be taken up on interest, to purchase materials towards carrying on said work.

At a Common Council held September 1, 1752:

Resolved, That the foundation of the Exchange, now building at the lower end of Broad street, on the west side thereof, be taken up, and that the same be made four feet wider on said west side.

At a Common Council held October 4, 1752 :

Resolved, That the parts of the foundation of the Exchange on the east side be taken up, and five arches be made on each side instead of six, with two at each end.

At a Common Council held February 18, 1758:

Mr. Koper Dawson, merchant, having proposed to lease the upper part of the Exchange, it is ordered that the said upper part of the Exchange, together with the room under the stairs, be leased to the said Koper Dawson for three years, at a yearly rent of forty pounds.

At a Common Council held January 13,1760:

Ordered, that advertisement be published for letting to farm, bv public outcry, the Exchange-house now in the possession of Mr. Koper Dawson.

At a Common Council held February 26, 1760:

Mr. Mayor informed the Board that Mr. Watts and others had sent for a large clock, which they intended as a public one, and desired him to propose to the Common Council that, if they would take charge of it and erect it in the Exchange at their own expense, it was at their service. Which was agreed to.

At a Common Council held February 10, 1764 :

Ordered, that the Clerk prepare a lease from this Corporation to Turner, for the Exchange for one year, at a rent of eighty pounds.

At a Common Council held February, 1765 :

Ordered, that the Exchange be let to Thomas Jackson for one year, at a rent of sixty pounds.

At a Common Council held February, 1769 :

Messrs. Isaac Low, Thomas Handle, William Walton, Isaac Roosevelt, and Lawrence Cortwright personally made application for the use of the Exchange-house, for one year from the first day of May next, for the Chamber of Commerce, on such terms as they shall think fit and reasonable. Thereupon, resolved and ordered, that the said Exchange- house be let to them for one year, on their putting the same in good repair, and permitting this Corporation to make use of it as often as they shall judge necessary.

Same meeting:

Ordered, that Mr. John Abeel do purchase for the use of this Corporation three bells, one for the new Gaol-house, one other for the City Hall, and the other for the Exchange-house.

At a Common Council held April 14, 1784:

Ordered, that the lower part of the building commonly called the Exchange be used until further order as a public market-place.

At a Common Council held June 30, 1784 :

A petition of Christopher Miller for himself and other inhabitants for the use of the long room in the Exchange, as a school for the instruction of youths in military exercise, was read and granted until further order.

At a Common Council held August 22, 1787:

A petition of Christopher Colles for the use of the Exchange-room, for the purpose of giving lectures on gunnery, etc., was granted.

At a Common Council held June 4, 1792

A petition of a number of inhabitants in the vicinity of the Exchange, praying that the building may be removed, was read and referred to the Street Committee.

At a Common Council held August 20, 1792:

The Committee reported that they had not come to any conclusion. Whereupon the Board proceeded to the consideration of the expediency of taking down the said building, and on the question whether the same should be taken down being put, it passed in the negative by-all the members, except Alderman Wool, Alderman W. Van Zandt, and Mr. Harsen.

At a Common Council held July 9, 1798:

A petition complaining of the building called the Exchange as a great interruption to Broad street, and praying that it be taken down, was read and rejected.

At a Common Council held March 4, 1799 :

A petition for taking down and removing the Exchange was read and consideration postponed.

At a Common Council held March 11, 1799:

The Board proceeded to the subject of the removal of the public building called the Exchange, and on the question of granting the petition it passed in the affirmative, seven in favor and five opposed thereto whereupon a committee was appointed to take order for the removal of said building, between the 20th of May and 20th of June next, reserving for the public use the bell and stone flagging in and about said building, and such other articles as they may judge proper. The present occupant to be notified to remove by the 20th of May next.

 

Website: The History Box.com
Article Name: Erection of the First Merchants' Exchange of N.Y. 1869
Researcher/Transcriber Miriam Medina

Source:

BIBLIOGRAPHY: From my collection of books: Manual of the Corporation of the City of New York; Joseph Shannon 1869
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